Maria Nordman | 4 rows

Maria Nordman
Alex Kitonic

The artist invites us and wishes for a better future.

Maria Nordman, Birth of the earth, 2021–22 (front of the drawing on the left, back of the drawing on the right). Double-sided collage of Canson paper and sections of paper from the bark of Australian eucalyptus trees, inks, crayons, white pencils, glue, lettering. Paper: 195/8 x 25 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

Maria Nordman: FirstMarian Goodman Gallery, twenty four 57th West West, New York City, March 5, 2022

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With its spirit and graphic sensibility, Maria Nordman’s work is reminiscent of one of Dr. Bronner’s All One Pure Castile Liquid Soap packages. Bronner’s wrapping, an image and a piece of self-conscious design, is a text that is rendered in Helvetica, stacked in blocks, and surrounded by bold colors, laying out information in a seemingly straightforward way, but with labels. The economics of the image are so extreme that it becomes dense and, as a result of dysfunction (which may be called anti-cultural), its “meaning” is almost inaccessible except for implications. .. How many times have you washed yourself with the powerful scent of eucalyptus, without considering the text from the excitement of the bottle? Absolute cleanliness is piety! to start. No one but God has given a person love that can cause mere dust in life!

Maria Nordman, LA TERRE EN DONNANT NAISSANCE, 2021–22 (front of the drawing on the left, back of the drawing on the right). Double-sided collage of Canson paper and sections of paper from the bark of Australian eucalyptus trees, inks, crayons, white pencils, glue, lettering. Paper: 195/8 x 25 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

The Nordman project shares some of this evangelical New Age enthusiasm. It’s a conceptual chestnut de coeur, a desperate hosana, a wish for a better tomorrow, and therefore the artist is a California product of the 1960s, all of which has a painful combination to imply. Of course. Trained in art and filmmaking near James Turrell and Robert Irwin at the University of California, Los Angeles, Nordman and her cohort explore the environment of Southern California, its light and space, and are the same components. I made a work that looks intangible. However, when opting out of purity, Nordman goes in another direction, in one example, Film room: smoke (1967–), portrait of a couple smoking along a rugged coastline. This cuts the projection space with a noisy charm. Then, in 1983, the warehouse to be demolished adjacent to the Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles was flooded with water, and in 1995, the outer wall of Geffen Contemporary was carved at the same facility to collect dust and debris. Otherwise empty space.

Maria Nordman, Kuzardunia2021, Draw White Cape / Canvas, and Kuzardunia, 2021, drawn on a black cape / canvas. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

Turrell’s work resembles a VR environment and plays games that are as perceptual as the digital realm (in 2013, the public was welcomed by the Guggenheim Museum and enjoyed a lounge-like light show. The artist’s pilgrimage to the magnificent Arizona Roden Crater), Nordman’s work has become more interactive over time. At her final exhibition in New York at the Marian Goodman Gallery in 2015, Nordman adventured in Central Park (“Lungs of the City”) with a cape and poster (“Birth of the Earth”). When. Some rejuvenated her outfit, while others re-conceived the park and wrote on her slit poster board to record ideas for “what the city needs.” World; Joseph Beuys of Germany called it “social sculpture”. These answers, placed horizontally on the table more like artifacts than the artwork for her current exhibition at Marian Goodman, are pedestrians. “Water”, “air”, “Arbores“”Fleur, “” Sun “,” Moon “,” Park “. We already know what it takes to grow the world again (in fact, there are many already), but today we can’t dream of the elements when elements are aggregates, that is, pollution of all kinds. Hurt life— It really bothers us.

Maria Nordman, Air water, 2015 (front of image on the left, back of image on the right). Paper, markers, mylars, crayons. Paper: 20 x 26 1/8 inch. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

But Nordman’s job isn’t just about itself. It’s also about the world system. A series of double-sided frame drawings, mounted at floor level and hinged on the wall to allow finger movement and swaying, have the following words: TERRE (French for “land” or “earth”), Tierra (Same for Spanish), and UNESCO, A special delegation of the United Nations dedicated to promoting world peace. The spirit of oneworldness, the echo of Bronner’s, floats throughout the show. This kind of wishful thinking is not “incorrect”, but it is in great danger today, with walls and demagogues springing up like mushrooms on Earth. Aiming at the moon, Nordman is trying to connect her utopian project to the movement of the Earth. At the start, Opened on the first day of the new year.To remind you of the potential meaning of big dates (is there any sign of a big change?), The artist posted a front page for. New York Times Behind the plexiglass from December 31, 1999. It’s not clear if the millennial articles contained therein are meaningful. Times It’s not as permeable as the Dr. Bronner’s label, but certain items resonate and hum. I was attracted to the news of George Harrison’s stab wound and noticed a story about the bomb plot, but what seems close to home at first glance is UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan and his ” This is a report on the “uneasy” method.

Maria Nordman, December 31, 1999 (Details on the right). newspaper. 115/8 x 13 1/2 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

When I first visited the exhibition, all the lights were off and it was evening, so the gallery was very dark. A crank-type solar flashlight sitting on a pedestal near the door gave off an eerie glow. As I grabbed one and walked around, I was able to catch a glimpse of the fossil with a tall rotating sculpture that doubles as an archive. In the back room, the artist’s catalog collection opened and stood at the bottom, as if ready to revive. The refusal of artificial lighting evokes a late-stage scenario, inviting viewers to imagine what the world would look like when the lights were finally turned off (probably Nordman is a kind of survival conceptualism, It’s an aesthetic version that ignites in a trash can), and at the same time, as backpackers say, you’re asked to imagine the existence of Net Zero, which only takes memory and leaves only footprints, in time with the rhythm of the day. When I returned to the gallery in gray snow on Thursday, I got a little better grasp of things (the poncho hanging from the ceiling spun with new vitality), but the search feeling of seeing in the dark was Somehow it seemed like a more suitable lens.

Maria Nordman, Geography Aesthetics / Presentation,2013. A plexiglass stand that draws inserts in the artist’s book, Vellum. Cologne: Walter Koenig, 2013. Courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery. Photo: Maria Nordman and Alex Udson. © Maria Nordman.

Not only did Nordman complete a number of her most important projects where the artist lived in Germany (the country of her birth) for many years, but she worked too wastefully for American tastes. And it’s too utopian. It embraces and promises a lot. Nordman’s practice may remind one of her contemporaries, but her play in words leads to a comparison with the genomic statement provided by the late Lawrence Weiner, but she. Architectural intervention speaks to the Dan Graham pavilion, but her efforts belong to the art movement rather than the art movement. A dream of the heat of world transformation. It’s something small that wants to do something big, and probably linked to many other efforts, one day it will be. Nordman dates many of her works with open-ended dashes, claiming both their presence and unfinished quality. Her position is quite savior, and like all saviors, one feels terrible suspicion and wonder when looking at her offerings. Imagine what would happen, how amazing, how it changed, and how beautiful it would be if her artistic promises were brought to Earth, but these days, such edenic I can’t imagine the possibility of a new world growing.

Alex Kitnick is an assistant professor of art history and visual culture at Bard College in Annandale, Hudson, NY.

The artist invites us and wishes for a better future.

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